Thank You Lord

Thank You Lord

Lord, thank you for this sink of dirty dishes; we have plenty of food to eat. Thank you for this pile of dirty, stinky laundry; we have plenty of nice clothes to wear. And I would like to thank you, Lord, for those unmade beds; they were so warm and comfortable last night. I know that many have no bed. My thanks to you, Lord, for this bathroom, complete with all the splattered mirrors, soggy, grimy towels and dirty lavatory; they are so convenient. Thank you for this finger-smudged refrigerator that needs defrosting so badly; it has served us faithfully for many years. It is full of cold drinks and enough leftovers for two or three meals. Thank you, Lord, for this oven that absolutely must be cleaned today. It has baked so many things over the years. The whole family is grateful for that tall grass that needs mowing, the lawn that needs raking; we all enjoy the yard. Thank you, Lord, even for that slamming screen door. My kids are healthy and able to run and play. Lord, the presence of all these chores awaiting me says You have richly blessed my family. I shall do them cheerfully and I shall do them gratefully. — Author Unknown Meditation: in everything give thanks; for this is the will of

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Alphabets of Happiness

Alphabets of Happiness

Alphabets of Happiness  A–Accept Accept others for who they are and for the choices they’ve made even if you have difficulty understanding their beliefs, motives, or actions. B–Break Away Break away from everything that stands in the way of what you hope to accomplish with your life. C–Create Create a family of friends whom you can share your hopes, dreams, sorrows, and happiness with. D–Decide Decide that you’ll be successful and happy come what may, and good things will find you. The roadblocks are only minor obstacles along the way. E–Explore Explore and experiment. The world has much to offer, and you have much to give. And every time you try something new, you’ll learn more about yourself. F–Forgive Forgive and forget. Grudges only weigh you down and inspire unhappiness and grief. Soar above it, and remember that everyone makes mistakes. G–Grow Leave the childhood monsters behind. They can no longer hurt you or stand in your way. H–Hope Hope for the best and never forget that anything is possible as long as you remain dedicated to the task. I–Ignore Ignore the negative voice inside your head. Focus instead on your goals and remember your accomplishments. Your past success is only a small inkling of what the future holds. J–Journey Journey to new worlds, new possibilities, by remaining open-minded. Try

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The Old Man

The Old Man

There was a poor old man who has a young boy and a beautiful white horse. Everybody in the town admires the horse. The king offered him a big amount of money to buy the horse but he said to him; “STOP! This horse is neither just an animal nor a product for sale but a person and A GREAT FRIEND to me!” One day, one morning, the horse disappeared from the stable into thin air. The villagers gathered and jeered at him saying; oh foolish old man, you refused to sell the horse at a bigger price but now tell us, of what benefit is it to you now? But he said, “STOP! Do not say that the horse was stolen but is not in the stable. You don’t know if it is my misfortune or a blessing to me!” After 15 days, the horse came back with nine beautiful wild horses. The villagers again came and said; “Wow! You are right! It was a blessing indeed to you.” But the old man said; “STOP! You do not know if the homecoming with wild horses are plague or blessing to me!” The old man’s boy started to raise the 10 horses but one very bad day, the son fall from one of the horses and broke his two legs.

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It Takes A Child

It Takes A Child

We were the only family with children in the restaurant. I sat Erik in a high chair and noticed everyone was quietly eating and talking. Suddenly, Erik squealed with glee and said, “Hi there.” He pounded his fat baby hands on the high-chair tray. His eyes were wide with excitement and his mouth was bared in a toothless grin. He then, wriggled and giggled with merriment. I looked around and saw the source of his merriment. It was a man with a tattered rag of a coat; dirty, greasy and worn. His pants were baggy with a zipper at half-mast and his toes poked out of would-be shoes. His shirt was dirty and his hair was uncombed and unwashed. His whiskers were too short to be called a beard and his nose was so varicose it looked like a road map. We were too far from him to smell, but I was sure he smelled. His hands waved and flapped on loose wrists. “Hi there, baby; hi there, big boy. I see ya, buster,” the man said to Erik. My husband and I exchanged looks, “What do we do?” Erik continued to laugh and answer, “Hi, hi there.” Everyone in the restaurant noticed and looked at us and then at the man. The old geezer was creating a nuisance with

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His Name was Fleming

His Name was Fleming

His name was Fleming, and he was a poor Scottish farmer. One day, while trying to eke out a living for his family, he heard a cry for help coming from a nearby boy. He dropped his tools and ran to the boy. There, mired to his waist in black muck, was a terrified boy, screaming and struggling to free himself. Farmer Fleming saved the lad from what could have been a slow and terrifying death. The next day, a carriage pulled up to the Scotsman’s sparse surroundings. An elegantly dressed nobleman stepped out and introduced himself as the father of the boy Farmer Fleming had saved. “I want to repay you,” said the nobleman. “You saved my son’s life.” “No, I can’t accept payment for what I did,” the Scottish farmer replied, waving off the offer. At that moment, the farmer’s own son came to the door of the family’s cottage. “Is that your son?” the nobleman asked. “Yes,” the farmer replied proudly. “I’ll make you a deal. Let me take him and give him a good education. If the lad is anything like his father, he’ll grow to a man you can be proud of.” And that he did. In time, Farmer Fleming’s son graduated from St. Mary’s Hospital Medical School in London and went on to become

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The Writer

The Writer

I wanted to be a writer but found myself working at a newspaper office as the bookkeeper. A couple of times I handed little articles to the newspaper owner that he accepted to run in the editorial column. At that time, the newspaper office had a staff of three reporters. The boss kept asking them to write feature stories, which he felt were good fodder for entertaining our small town readers. In a throwback to the past, about that time a small boy started showing up in town with a little wooden shoe shine box. With tennis shoes and sandals the primary footwear of most people, he didn’t have many customers; but he made a colorful sight. The boss thought he would make a great story. Several times, I heard him, suggest, ask, and finally almost demand that one of the reporters write that feature. Finally, I went to his office and asked if he would mind if I took a stab at writing the story. Once I had his permission, I set up an interview with the little boy and his family. Armed with a stenographer’s pad for taking notes, I went out that evening to do my interview. The house where the family lived was exceedingly poor. There was hardly any furniture. The bare wood floors had no

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